How to Get the Most out of Cycling Training Camps

Training camps can be as brutal as they are exhilarating. Here's how to stay strong and keep improving when you're putting in serious saddle time.

BY MOLLY HURFORD Whether you're counting down to a bike vacation or a serious cycling training camp, riding at any level of intensity over a long period of time can be tough—no matter how much fun you're having. Get through your heavy-riding program with flair by following these tips from a crew of elite junior racers who finished up a 500-mile training block in six days

Check the Weather

Pack for the weather you’re likely to encounter, suggests Centurion Next Wave team member Brody Sanderson. “Know and understand the climate of where you're going—like whether you need booties or sun sleeves," he says. "Trust me, it's an issue, and if you aren’t prepared for any part of the temperature spectrum you’ll pay for it later.” Check the forecast, but be prepared for temperatures a few degrees cooler or warmer than predicted. Prepping for a hot climate? Pack a thin windbreaker just in case. If you’re heading somewhere chilly, make sure you have shorts in case of a hot snap or an indoor ride day. And always, always have rain gear.

Take Care of Yourself

If you’re on a tour through a beautiful part of the world or digging into a high-intensity camp, it's important to practice good hygiene. Your immune system will already be compromised from the long hours, so taking precautions to avoid health problems is key. This means washing your hands frequently, only drinking water you know is from a safe source, cleaning out your water bottles, and taking care of things like sunburn and road rash to avoid any chance of infection. "Doing huge training blocks can make you sick, which can prevent you from continuing your block and it's just not worth it when it's so easy," says 16-year-old Matt Staples of Centurion Next Wave. "The key is to manage the small things that are so simple but can really benefit you in the long run.”

Be Ready for Downtime

You’ll be riding long hours, but after your rides, you may find yourself with a lot of spare time to fill. It might be tempting, especially on the first couple days, to cram in extra activities and workouts, but solid rest is very important—and by rest, that doesn’t mean filling spare time with calls to the office. "I would not make it through a big training block without Netflix,” says Graydon Staples, another Centurion Next Wave team member. “Once I finish a big ride, I like to go back to my room and take it easy while watching whatever there is on Netflix.” For some people that would sound ideal, but for others, chilling out is a chore. Just think of it as part two of your workout: recovery.

Use Chamois Cream Liberally

“The best advice I could give to a rider putting in a big block is the vast use of chamois cream, something to prevent chaffing,” says Matt Staples. All of the juniors at the camp echoed his sentiment. Chamois cream helps fight friction in the saddle and can help prevent saddle sores. If it’s applied too late, the cream can still alleviate some of the discomfort.

Embrace the Highs and Lows

"My best advice for someone who is going to put in a big training block is to really make sure you’re being honest with how you're feeling,” says Team Progressive member Liam Mulcahy. Not only will some days feel harder on your body, there will be days that take a toll on your mind and emotions, as well. A few flats, a crash in your group, or being the slowest one up the hill can be disheartening, but it happens to everyone." “Expect ups and downs during the ride but remember, be excited that you're able to go out and ride your bike in the first place,” says Erica Leonard of Norco & Garneau. Source: www.bicycling.com

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